Shreveport Neck Injury Lawyer

Filing a Claim for Damages

Neck injuries can cause anything from minor pain to paralysis and even death, in the case of a fracture of any of the bones in the neck and damage to the spinal cord. Neck injuries often occur after a car accident or other accidents. Any head impact can seriously injure the neck. If you have been involved in an accident it is important to know the signs of neck injuries.

Anytime you are involved in an accident, you should be fully evaluated by a medical professional, as early as possible after the incident. This applies whether you think you are injured or not, as injuries are not always initially apparent.

Signs You May Have a Neck Injury

The signs of a serious problem after a neck injury include:

  • Passing out
  • Seeming unresponsive
  • Pale and clammy skin
  • Loss of badder or bowel control
  • Inability to move a body part
  • Unstoppable bleeding
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Shortness of breath
  • Intense headache
  • Swelling of the head or neck

Any of these signs indicate the need for immediate emergency medical attention.

What to Expect from a Severe Neck Injury

If you have suffered a fracture to any of the bones of the neck, the treatment will include keeping the neck immobile until the fracture is healed. This can take several months or longer. In some cases, surgery is necessary in order to realign the bones and may need to be held together with screws and a metal plate. Once your doctor gives you the go-ahead, you will need to begin exercises to build strength and increase range of motion, ideally with a physical therapist.

Our firm has been successful in helping people recover financial compensation to help cover the medical costs resulting from their accident. Contact us to discuss your case today.

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