Filing an Injury Claim for Broken Bones

Guidance from Our Shreveport Personal Injury Lawyer

Broken bones are a common result of many kinds of accidents. There are several different kinds of fractures but all fractures are extremely painful and need to be treated immediately. If you have been in a slip and fall accident or some other kind of accident and have broken a bone, contact a Shreveport injury lawyer today.

Not only are there medical costs, but a broken bone can keep you out of work for a protracted length of time. You need to make sure that you are covered for these expenses and losses.

Morris, Dewett & Savoie, LLC has many attributes that can safeguard your future:

  • Reputation of serving our clients well
  • Numerous large settlements won
  • More than 70 years of combined practice

Defending the Rights of Accident Victims

Bone fractures are classified in a number of different ways. A hairline fracture is where there is a split along the bone but it hasn't separated. A simple fracture is when the bone is broken into two pieces and a compound fracture is a case in which the bone punctures the skin after breaking. Any fracture needs to be treated by a skilled medical professional to ensure that the bone heals in the proper way.

Holding the Liable Party Responsible

Accidents that result in broken bones may involve another party who was negligent and contributed to the accident. In this case, the other party may be held liable. An example of this would be an accident caused by a careless driver who was texting while driving.

Other types of accidents where another party was negligent might be accidents resulting from faulty products. Call our office today and we can help you. With our long experience in the field of personal injury, we are the law firm that you want to have at your side.

The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship.