Woman Sues Florist for Injuries Sustained from Dog Bite

Friday, January 3, a woman has filed a lawsuit in Gretna for an incident from last February where she says she sustained injuries from a shop owner's poodle. According to her claim, she was at the florist where the proprietor let the dog roam, and the dog bit her in the hand, inflicting serious injuries. She is alleging that the injuries resulted from the owner's negligence, and she is seeking compensation for her medical bills and for both physical and mental pain and suffering.

Just as serious as the physical injuries can be, perhaps leading to infection or requiring surgery, another reason that dog bites have to be taken seriously is that they often inflict mental anguish as well. If you or someone you know has suffered a dog attack, then you may be entitled to compensation for your pain, as well as for the resulting financial losses. In Louisiana, the dog owner can be held liable for your injuries, regardless of whether the injury was a bite or another type of injury, and whether or not the owner was previously aware that their dog posed a threat. With the right evidence, such as photographs, a police report, and the contact information of the owner and other witnesses, you may have what you need to craft a strong injury claim. And with the right legal counsel, you may be able to succeed in your claim and to take the first steps to recovery after these distressing injuries.

If you are looking for the best dog bite lawyer in Shreveport, then contact Morris, Dewett & Savoie, LLC today. The legal team at our firm has more than 70 years of combined experience with which we can help you. Get started on your case today when you schedule a free no-obligation consultation with a skilled Shreveport personal injury lawyer from our firm.

Categories: Personal Injury
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