Pedestrian Hit by Semi-Truck Blamed for Accident

On Saturday, January 11, a woman was walking along the U.S. 165 in Caldwell Parish when she was struck by an 18-wheeler. She survived, and is getting treatment at a hospital, but she has also been charged for the accident because she is said to have violated a law of traffic. According to Louisiana State Police, the woman is under suspicion of being intoxicated at the time of the accident, but that the semi-truck driver is under no such suspicion. Toxicology results are pending. Officials also said that there are no street lights at the site of the collision, and that at the time of the accident there was rain.

It is the rare case where a pedestrian is faulted for a collision, but it does happen. This is usually the case when the pedestrian is found to be drunk, and/or they broke a traffic laws, such as by jaywalking or walking on a freeway. In most cases, however, a motorist will be liable for a pedestrian and car accident. This means that the pedestrian is entitled to compensation, and likely needs it. While a car driver has a seat belt, a metal frame, a windshield, and an airbag all shielding them, a pedestrian has nothing to protect them from impact. This often results in catastrophic injuries, such as brain trauma, fractured bones, and spinal cord damage, all of which further leads to a mountain of medical bills and weeks, if not months, of time off work. With a personal injury claim, you may be able to recover the compensation that is owed you, the compensation that can help you to medical and financial recovery.

Learn more when you contact a Shreveport personal injury lawyer at Morris, Dewett & Savoie, LLC. We have several decades of experience with which we may be able to help you obtain the compensation that you truly deserve.

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