Minor Sues Club for Allegedly Selling Him Alcohol Before He Crashed

In Gretna, a minor under the age of 21 is suing the club that allegedly served him alcoholic beverages before he got into a car accident. According to the suit, the minor failed to maintain control of his car and crashed into a cement support pole, when hours previous he had been served alcoholic beverages at a club where servers knew that he was younger than 21. He is accusing the club of not taking the right precautions against underage drinking, and not training workers correctly. He is also leveling the charge that they did not even checking his identification to see if he was old enough or if the credit card he used was really his. His lawsuit is asking for compensation for the injuries he sustained in the accident.

This lawsuit is possible because of dram shop liability laws. Under these laws, a vendor of alcohol can be held responsible for a drunk driving accident caused by their patron. It is rare for the person who actually did the drunk driving to win a lawsuit against a bar; when this does happen, it usually is because the driver was underage. It is also possible for those injured by a drunk driver to sue the bar (or restaurant or club) that served alcohol to that driver when they were clearly inebriated already. As with any personal injury case, if you can prove negligence, you should be able to prove that you deserve compensation for your resulting injuries.

When you are not the one responsible for your injuries, neither should you be responsible for the steep medical and repair bills you face. With fair compensation, you should be covered for these, and for lost wages too. To learn more about your rights to compensation, contact a Shreveport injury lawyer at Morris, Dewett & Savoie, LLC today!

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