Helmet Laws and Motorcycle Accidents

It is important to realize that while riding a motorcycle can be a thrilling experience, it is also one that is extremely dangerous and requires the utmost caution. It is for this reason that helmet laws have been established and enforced for those who chose to use this method of transportation, because in the event of an accident, a helmet may be what saves your very life.

Depending on the state in which you live, there are likely mandatory laws that require riders to wear protected equipment as they travel on a motorcycle. Not only may this include the use of a helmet for you (and a passenger if you so choose) but also face shields, gloves, etc. Throughout years of statistics and research, those laws which specifically enforce the use of a helmet for any person on a motorcycle (the rider or a passenger) has proven to save many lives throughout the years.

In the event that you are injured in an accident with another vehicle, and have decide to pursue a personal injury lawsuit, the driver may attempt to prove your contributory negligence in the accident because you were not properly protecting yourself on the road. This may result in the loss of the potential compensation for the suit, as well as fully preventing your being able to pursue legal action. In order to prove a personal injury suit, you need to be able to show that the other driver was responsible, and if they can show that the injury would not have occurred had you even wearing a helmet, there is a chance there will be no case.

Safe driving is important, both in the event of an accident, and for the legalities that follow. Contact Simmons, Morris & Carroll, today to further discus motorcycle accidents and injuries and to determine the best course of action for your unique situation!

Categories: Motorcycle Accidents
The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship.