Asiana Flight 214: Kills Two Students, Injuries Over 180 Passengers

This past weekend was one filled with heartbreaking accidents that claimed the lives of many people. In Canada, a train explosion caused an estimated 13 deaths, with about 50 people still missing and presumed dead. Another plane accident occurred in Alaska, in which 10 were killed, and in San Francisco a large flight coming from China, crash landed in San Francisco killing two people and injuring nearly all of the passengers on board.

According to reports of the flight, the plane had made a stop in South Korea before continuing on its way into the U.S., where they eventually crash landed in the airport. Just moments before the landing, the flights was said to be descending at a much faster rate than other flights would if traveling this same route, though the National Transportation Safety Board claims that the steep descent is not considered to be abnormal. Just four seconds before the impact, the aircraft sounded an alarm to the pilots warning that there might be an aerodynamic stall due to the lack of air speed. It is said that prior to landing on the flight path, the plane collided with the sea wall, causing an engine to detach and a fire to immediately erupt.

The plane finally came to a stop while sliding on its belly, causing a number of passengers to be trapped inside. Two were reported dead from the accident, possibly after being run over by emergency vehicles at the scene. At this time a number of people of all ages are still being treated for injuries, one of them being a young child who is in critical condition.

In the event that you or a loved one have been injured in an aviation accident, please contact Simmons, Morris & Carroll today to discuss taking legal action with a trusted Shreveport injury attorney.

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