High Impact Sports: How Hard is too Hard?

As millions tuned in to watch, the Super Bowl, one of the highest viewed television broadcasts in the nation, behind the scenes, the NFL is being drawn into the growing discussion over how brain damage and head injuries are changing the sport. While football began as mainly an offensive sport, the growing talent on defense has brought on an increase of tough contact in the sport. Hard hitting linemen, such as Baltimore Ravens' Bernard Pollard, would argue that a strong defense has become an equal factor in the game. The debate is over the question of whether these defensive tactics such as blocking and sacking, have become too violent and should be regulated more heavily to ensure the safety of the players. As the discussion continues on the public forum, actions are already being taken in the court room.

Over 4,000 former NFL players have filed suit against the league, including the family of star linebacker Junior Seau, who killed himself just last year. The suit claims that the league failed to adequately inform its players and their families of the possible term brain damage, both immediate and gradual, that results from such a high impact sport. While those who filed the lawsuit are seeking compensation for the damages, the NFL has filed a motion to dismiss the case, oral arguments for which will be heard by a judge on April 9.

While the national spotlight remains on the NFL, injuries such as those being contested occur daily in our own backyards. Players in both high school and college leagues have experienced the same injuries as those in the NFL, but their losses are no less significant. If you or a loved one is suffering symptoms from a sports related injury, you may be eligible for compensation. Call one of our Louisiana personal injury lawyers to discuss the process for getting you what you deserve.

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