Elderly Couple Killed in Three-Car Collision on N.C. Highway

Saturday, the 10th of August, three cars collided where the N.C. 87 and N.C. 11 meet. It was three in the afternoon, when a couple in their seventies merged their Camry into another car's lane. The second car rammed into the Camry at 55 miles per hour. The impact sent the Camry into another car. In total, 9 people were injured in the accident. Two of them, the older couple, died from the collision. According to the N. C. Highway Patrol, everyone had been wearing seat belts, and no one was going to file any charges.

While no one in particular may be held responsible for this sad accident, tens of thousands of people die in car accidents every year. Tragically, many of those accidents were preventable. It may be the other driver's fault. Perhaps someone behind the wheel is under the influence, ran through a red light, or is distracted by a text. A car manufacturer could be on the hook for your accident as well. If defective tire, faulty steering, or a misfiring airbag caused or contributed to your accident, then you may be owed compensation from an auto product liability claim.

At Simmons, Morris & Carroll, we understand the severity of injuries that can be sustained in any accident. A concussion and other traumatic brain injury can leave you with reduced cognitive abilities. Spinal cord injury threatens paralysis, and can cause severe, debilitating pain. Even broken bones can mean months of medical treatment and therapy. You may be left unable to work. When you or loved one has suffered from someone else's negligence, you may be able to pursue compensation through a personal injury or wrongful death claim. To learn more about your legal options, do not hesitate to contact a Shreveport personal injury lawyer from our firm today!

Categories: Car Accidents
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